d) Joy and Laughter

joy laughter beauty

Joy and Laughter: Top Quotes

  1. “I have said these things to you, so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete” (Jesus)
  2. “You will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy” (Jesus)
  3. “I will see you again and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you” (Jesus)
  4. “My spirit rejoices in God my Saviour.” (Mary)
  5. “We find our Christian joy in prayer, it comes from prayer and from giving thanks to God: “Thank you, Lord, for so many beautiful things!”… To have this Christian joy, first, is prayer; second, to give thanks… Third, let us think where I can go to bring a little relief, a little peace, to those who suffer. Pray, give thanks, and help others.” (Pope Francis)
  6. “The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus…. I invite all Christians, everywhere, at this very moment, to a renewed personal encounter with Jesus Christ, or at least an openness to letting him encounter them; I ask all of you to do this unfailingly each day. No one should think that this invitation is not meant for him or her, since “no one is excluded from the joy brought by the Lord” (Pope Paul VI) The Lord does not disappoint those who take this risk; whenever we take a step towards Jesus, we come to realize that he is already there, waiting for us with open arms.” (Pope Francis)
  7. “The Gospel, radiant with the glory of Christ’s cross, constantly invites us to rejoice. A few examples will suffice. “Rejoice!” is the angel’s greeting to Mary (Lk 1:28). Mary’s visit to Elizabeth makes John leap for joy in his mother’s womb (cf. Lk 1:41). In her song of praise, Mary proclaims: “My spirit rejoices in God my Saviour” (Lk 1:47)…. Jesus himself “rejoiced in the Holy Spirit” (Lk 10:21)….Wherever the disciples went, “there was great joy” (8:8); even amid persecution they continued to be “filled with joy” (13:52)….Why should we not also enter into this great stream of joy?” (Pope Francis)
  8. “There are Christians whose lives seem like Lent without Easter.” (Pope Francis)
  9. “Joy adapts and changes, but it always endures, even as a flicker of light born of our personal certainty that, when everything is said and done, we are infinitely loved. I understand the grief of people who have to endure great suffering, yet slowly but surely we all have to let the joy of faith slowly revive as a quiet yet firm trust, even amid the greatest distress.” (Pope Francis)
  10. “I can say that the most beautiful and natural expressions of joy which I have seen in my life were in poor people who had little to hold on to. I also think of the real joy shown by others who, even amid pressing professional obligations, were able to preserve, in detachment and simplicity, a heart full of faith.” (Pope Francis)
  11. “Life grows by being given away, and it weakens in isolation and comfort. Indeed, those who enjoy life most are those who leave security on the shore and become excited by the mission of communicating life to others” (Fifth General Conference of the Latin American and Caribbean Bishops, Aparecida Document, 29 June 2007, 360; as quoted by Pope Francis)
  12. “Christians have the duty to proclaim the Gospel without excluding anyone. Instead of seeming to impose new obligations, they should appear as people who wish to share their joy, who point to a horizon of beauty and who invite others to a delicious banquet. It is not by proselytizing that the Church grows, but “by attraction” (Benedict XVI, 2007; as quoted by Pope Francis).” (Pope Francis)
  13. “An evangelizing community is filled with joy; it knows how to rejoice always. It celebrates every small victory, every step forward in the work of evangelization.” (Pope Francis)
  14. The joy of the Gospel is such that it cannot be taken away from us by anyone or anything (cf. Jn 16:22). The evils of our world – and those of the Church – must not be excuses for diminishing our commitment and our fervour. Let us look upon them as challenges which can help us to grow. With the eyes of faith, we can see the light which the Holy Spirit always radiates in the midst of darkness, never forgetting that “where sin increased, grace has abounded all the more” (Rom 5:20)(Pope Francis)
  15. “To attract ordinary people… I believe that the secret lies in the way Jesus looked at people, seeing beyond their weaknesses and failings… Full of joy in the Spirit, he blesses the Father who draws the little ones to him… The Lord truly enjoys talking with his people; the preacher should strive to communicate that same enjoyment to his listeners.” (Pope Francis)
  16. “A committed missionary knows the joy of being a spring which spills over and refreshes others. Only the person who feels happiness in seeking the good of others, in desiring their happiness, can be a missionary. This openness of the heart is a source of joy, since “it is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). We do not live better when we flee, hide, refuse to share, stop giving and lock ourselves up in own comforts. Such a life is nothing less than slow suicide.” (Pope Francis)
  17. “What the world can never offer is lasting joy and peace. These are the gifts which only the Holy Spirit can give.” (Pope John-Paul II)
  18. “Jesus’ message as a whole invites us of joy,  a joy that no one can take from us, and laughter is the exuberant expression of that joy…. In laughter we manifest that we are on good terms with reality, and on good terms with God. In laughter we affirm, loud, joyously, and to the world, the great mantra of Julian of Norwich that, in the end all will be well, and all will be well, and every manner of being will be well—even though our world is not in that state today.” (Fr Ron Rolheiser)
  19. “Our faith makes us leave our homes and go forth to encounter others, to share their joys, their hopes and their frustrations…. It makes us able to laugh with those who laugh, and rejoice with our neighbors who rejoice.” (Pope Francis)
  20. “Christian joy is a gift of the Holy Spirit: it is having one’s heart ever joyful because the Lord has triumphed, the Lord reigns, the Lord is at the right hand of the Father, the Lord has looked at me and sent me and has given me his grace and has made me a child of the Father”. (Pope Francis)
  21. “A Christian lives in joy”. (Pope Francis)
  22. “But where is this joy in the saddest moments, in times of anguish? Let’s think about Jesus on the Cross: did He have joy? Eh, no! But yes, He had peace! Indeed, joy, in the moment of anguish, of trial, becomes peace.” (Pope Francis)
  23. “A Christian who, in the moment of trial, of illness, of so many difficulties, loses peace – something is lacking in him.” (Pope Francis)
  24. “Having joy is asking for the gift of the Holy Spirit.” (Pope Francis)
  25. “Jesus Christ, rising from the dead, has made man’s life one long festival of joy.” (Saint Athanasius)
  26. “All the more does man know spiritual joy or happiness when his spirit enters into possession of God.” (Pope Paul VI)
  27. “There is also needed a patient effort to teach people, or teach them once more, how to savor in a simple way the many human joys that the Creator places in our path” (Pope Paul VI)
  28. “In essence, Christian joy is the spiritual sharing in the unfathomable joy, both divine and human, which is in the heart of Jesus Christ glorified.” (Pope Paul VI)
  29. “If Jesus radiates such peace, such assurance, such happiness, such availability, it is by reason of the inexpressible love by which He knows that He is loved by His Father.” (Pope Paul VI)
  30. “Joy gives the heart a catholic openness to the world of people.” (Pope Paul VI)
  31. “The joy of divine Truth… This is the joy which is offered to you. It gives itself to those who love it enough to seek it tenaciously.” (Pope Paul VI)
  32. “The fundamental and simple reasons for joy? God has so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son; through His Spirit, God’s presence does not cease to enfold us with His tenderness and to fill us with His life.” (Pope Paul VI)
  33. “The need for baptized Christians to be faithful to the Sunday celebration, in joy, of the Eucharist. How could they neglect this encounter, this banquet which Christ prepares for us in His love?” (Pope Paul VI)
  34. “Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say: Rejoice.” (St Paul)

Joy and Laughter: Full Quotes and Sources of Quotes

  • “I have said these things to you, so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete” (Jn 15:11)
  • “You will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy” (Jn 16:20)
  • “But I will see you again and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you” (Jn 16:22)
  • “Just so, I tell you, there will be more joy in heaven over one sinner who repents than ninety-nine righteous persons who need no repentance” (Lk 15:7)

— Jesus

“My spirit rejoices in God my Saviour.”

— Mary (in the Gospel of Luke 1:47)

“The joy of Christmas is a special joy; but it is a joy that isn’t just for the day of Christmas, it is for the entire life of a Christian. It is a serene and tranquil joy, a joy that forever accompanies the Christian….

Christian joy is a gift from the Lord. “Ah, Father, we’ll have a nice big luncheon, everybody will be happy”. This is lovely, a nice luncheon is good; but this isn’t the Christian joy we are talking about today. Christian joy is something else. It brings us together to celebrate, it’s true. Thus the Church wants you to understand what Christian joy is.

The Apostle St Paul says to the Thessalonians: “Brothers, rejoice always”. And how can I rejoice? He says: “pray constantly, give thanks in all circumstances”. We find our Christian joy in prayer, it comes from prayer and from giving thanks to God: “Thank you, Lord, for so many beautiful things!”…

To have this Christian joy, first, is prayer; second, to give thanks… Third, let us think where I can go to bring a little relief, a little peace, to those who suffer. Pray, give thanks, and help others.”

— Pope Francis in a great ‘Gaudete Sunday’ homily to a parish in Rome on 14th December 2014.

The next 20 joy-filled quotes are all from Pope Francis’s “The Joy of the Gospel“, published in late 2013

  1. The joy of the gospel fills the hearts and lives of all who encounter Jesus.
  2. Those who accept his offer of salvation are set free from sin, sorrow, inner emptiness and loneliness.
  3. With Christ joy is constantly born anew.
  4. The great danger in today’s world, pervaded as it is by consumerism, is the desolation and anguish born of a complacent yet covetous heart, the feverish pursuit of frivolous pleasures, and a blunted conscience. Whenever our interior life becomes caught up in its own interests and concerns, there is no longer room for others, no place for the poor. God’s voice is no longer heard, the quiet joy of his love is no longer felt, and the desire to do good fades. This is a very real danger for believers too. Many fall prey to it, and end up resentful, angry and listless. That is no way to live a dignified and fulfilled life; it is not God’s will for us, nor is it the life in the Spirit which has its source in the heart of the risen Christ.
  5. I invite all Christians, everywhere, at this very moment, to a renewed personal encounter with Jesus Christ, or at least an openness to letting him encounter them; I ask all of you to do this unfailingly each day. No one should think that this invitation is not meant for him or her, since “no one is excluded from the joy brought by the Lord” (Pope Paul VI) The Lord does not disappoint those who take this risk; whenever we take a step towards Jesus, we come to realize that he is already there, waiting for us with open arms.
  6. Now is the time to say to Jesus: “Lord, I have let myself be deceived; in a thousand ways I have shunned your love, yet here I am once more, to renew my covenant with you. I need you. Save me once again, Lord, take me once more into your redeeming embrace”. How good it feels to come back to him whenever we are lost!
  7. … the joy which we experience daily, amid the little things of life, as a response to the loving invitation of God our Father: “My child, treat yourself well, according to your means… Do not deprive yourself of the day’s enjoyment” (Sir 14:11, 14). What tender paternal love echoes in these words!
  8. The Gospel, radiant with the glory of Christ’s cross, constantly invites us to rejoice. A few examples will suffice. “Rejoice!” is the angel’s greeting to Mary (Lk 1:28). Mary’s visit to Elizabeth makes John leap for joy in his mother’s womb (cf. Lk 1:41). In her song of praise, Mary proclaims: “My spirit rejoices in God my Saviour” (Lk 1:47). When Jesus begins his ministry, John cries out: “For this reason, my joy has been fulfilled” (Jn 3:29). Jesus himself “rejoiced in the Holy Spirit” (Lk 10:21). His message brings us joy: “I have said these things to you, so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete” (Jn 15:11). Our Christian joy drinks of the wellspring of his brimming heart. He promises his disciples: “You will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy” (Jn 16:20). He then goes on to say: “But I will see you again and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you” (Jn 16:22). The disciples “rejoiced” (Jn 20:20) at the sight of the risen Christ. In the Acts of the Apostles we read that the first Christians “ate their food with glad and generous hearts” (2:46). Wherever the disciples went, “there was great joy” (8:8); even amid persecution they continued to be “filled with joy” (13:52). The newly baptized eunuch “went on his way rejoicing” (8:39), while Paul’s jailer “and his entire household rejoiced that he had become a believer in God” (16:34). Why should we not also enter into this great stream of joy?
  9. There are Christians whose lives seem like Lent without Easter. I realize of course that joy is not expressed the same way at all times in life, especially at moments of great difficulty. Joy adapts and changes, but it always endures, even as a flicker of light born of our personal certainty that, when everything is said and done, we are infinitely loved. I understand the grief of people who have to endure great suffering, yet slowly but surely we all have to let the joy of faith slowly revive as a quiet yet firm trust, even amid the greatest distress…
  10. I can say that the most beautiful and natural expressions of joy which I have seen in my life were in poor people who had little to hold on to. I also think of the real joy shown by others who, even amid pressing professional obligations, were able to preserve, in detachment and simplicity, a heart full of faith.
  11. The Gospel offers us the chance to live life on a higher plane, but with no less intensity: “Life grows by being given away, and it weakens in isolation and comfort. Indeed, those who enjoy life most are those who leave security on the shore and become excited by the mission of communicating life to others” (Fifth General Conference of the Latin American and Caribbean Bishops, Aparecida Document, 29 June 2007, 360)
  12. When the Church summons Christians to take up the task of evangelization, she is simply pointing to the source of authentic personal fulfilment. For “here we discover a profound law of reality: that life is attained and matures in the measure that it is offered up in order to give life to others.” (Fifth General Conference of the Latin American and Caribbean Bishops, Aparecida Document, 29 June 2007)
  13. Christians have the duty to proclaim the Gospel without excluding anyone. Instead of seeming to impose new obligations, they should appear as people who wish to share their joy, who point to a horizon of beauty and who invite others to a delicious banquet. It is not by proselytizing that the Church grows, but “by attraction” (Benedict XVI, 2007).
  14. In fidelity to the example of the Master, it is vitally important for the Church today to go forth and preach the Gospel to all: to all places, on all occasions, without hesitation, reluctance or fear. The joy of the Gospel is for all people: no one can be excluded. That is what the angel proclaimed to the shepherds in Bethlehem: “Be not afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of a great joy which will come to all the people (Lk 2:10)
  15. An evangelizing community is filled with joy; it knows how to rejoice always. It celebrates every small victory, every step forward in the work of evangelization.
  16. The joy of the Gospel is such that it cannot be taken away from us by anyone or anything (cf. Jn 16:22). The evils of our world – and those of the Church – must not be excuses for diminishing our commitment and our fervour. Let us look upon them as challenges which can help us to grow. With the eyes of faith, we can see the light which the Holy Spirit always radiates in the midst of darkness, never forgetting that “where sin increased, grace has abounded all the more” (Rom 5:20)
  17. In some places a spiritual “desertification” has evidently come about, as the result of attempts by some societies to build without God or to eliminate their Christian roots. In those places “the Christian world is becoming sterile, and it is depleting itself like an overexploited ground, which transforms into a desert”.[66] In other countries, violent opposition to Christianity forces Christians to hide their faith in their own beloved homeland. This is another painful kind of desert. But family and the workplace can also be a parched place where faith nonetheless has to be preserved and communicated. Yet “it is starting from the experience of this desert, from this void, that we can again discover the joy of believing, its vital importance for us men and women. In the desert we rediscover the value of what is essential for living; thus in today’s world there are innumerable signs, often expressed implicitly or negatively, of the thirst for God, for the ultimate meaning of life. And in the desert people of faith are needed who, by the example of their own lives, point out the way to the Promised Land and keep hope alive”.[67] In these situations we are called to be living sources of water from which others can drink.
  18. (Section 128) In this preaching, which is always respectful and gentle, the first step is personal dialogue, when the other person speaks and shares his or her joys, hopes and concerns for loved ones, or so many other heartfelt needs. Only afterwards is it possible to bring up God’s word, perhaps by reading a Bible verse or relating a story, but always keeping in mind the fundamental message: the personal love of God who became man, who gave himself up for us, who is living and who offers us his salvation and his friendship. This message has to be shared humbly as a testimony on the part of one who is always willing to learn, in the awareness that the message is so rich and so deep that it always exceeds our grasp. At times the message can be presented directly, at times by way of a personal witness or gesture, or in a way which the Holy Spirit may suggest in that particular situation. If it seems prudent and if the circumstances are right, this fraternal and missionary encounter could end with a brief prayer related to the concerns which the person may have expressed. In this way they will have an experience of being listened to and understood; they will know that their particular situation has been placed before God, and that God’s word really speaks to their lives.
  19. (Section 141) One cannot but admire the resources that the Lord used to dialogue with his people, to reveal his mystery to all and to attract ordinary people by his lofty teachings and demands. I believe that the secret lies in the way Jesus looked at people, seeing beyond their weaknesses and failings: “Fear not little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom” (Lk 12:32); Jesus preaches with that spirit. Full of joy in the Spirit, he blesses the Father who draws the little ones to him: “I thank you Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hidden these things from the wise and understanding and revealed them to babes” (Lk 10:21). The Lord truly enjoys talking with his people; the preacher should strive to communicate that same enjoyment to his listeners.
  20. A committed missionary knows the joy of being a spring which spills over and refreshes others. Only the person who feels happiness in seeking the good of others, in desiring their happiness, can be a missionary. This openness of the heart is a source of joy, since “it is more blessed to give than to receive” (Acts 20:35). We do not live better when we flee, hide, refuse to share, stop giving and lock ourselves up in own comforts. Such a life is nothing less than slow suicide.

— Pope Francis in his book (Apostolic Exhortation) “The Joy of the Gospel“, published in late 2013

“This meeting (with Jesus) leads us to become new men in the mystery of Grace, kindling in the spirit that Christian joy that is the hundredfold given by Christ to those who welcome him into their lives.”

— Pope Francis I, just days into his papacy, in his goodbye meeting with the cardinals on 15th March, 2013

“The modern technological world can offer us many pleasures, many comforts of life. It can even offer us temporary escapes from life. But what the world can never offer is lasting joy and peace. These are the gifts which only the Holy Spirit can give.”

— Pope John-Paul II, as quoted in “Pope John Paul II: In My Own Words”, 1998, Hodder and Stoughton Ltd, page 14, with the sub-heading “‘Meeting with Youth, New Orleans, 1987”.

“Karl Rahner suggests that laughter shows we are on good terms with reality and hence with God. Laughter praises God because it foretells our final state in Heaven when we will be in an exuberance of joy.
Commenting on the Beatitudes in Luke’s Gospel where Jesus says, blessed are you who are now weeping, for you shall laugh, Rahner says that what Jesus is saying suggests that the happiness of the final state will not just dry away our tears and bring us to peace, it will also bring us to laughter—”to an intoxication of joy”.
…. Jesus’ message as a whole invites us of joy,  a joy that no one can take from us, and laughter is the exuberant expression of that joy….
In laughter we manifest that we are on good terms with reality, and on good terms with God. In laughter we affirm, loud, joyously, and to the world, the great mantra of Julian of Norwich that, in the end all will be well, and all will be well, and every manner of being will be well—even though our world is not in that state today.”

— Fr Ron Rolheiser (‘Our Laughter as Faith’, from his weekly column which is currently (2015) published in 100 newspapers worldwide, September 23rd, 2012: ronrolheiser.com)

“Our revolution comes about through tenderness, through the joy which always becomes closeness and compassion, and leads us to get involved in, and to serve, the life of others. Our faith makes us leave our homes and go forth to encounter others, to share their joys, their hopes and their frustrations. Our faith, “calls us out of our house”, to visit the sick, the prisoner and to those who mourn. It makes us able to laugh with those who laugh, and rejoice with our neighbors who rejoice.

— Pope Francis in his homily in Cuba at the Sanctuary of Our Lady of Charity of El Cobre, Santiago, 22nd Sept 2015, as reported by Vatican Radio

“Christian joy is not simply enjoyment, it isn’t fleeting lightheartedness”. Instead, “Christian joy is a gift of the Holy Spirit: it is having one’s heart ever joyful because the Lord has triumphed, the Lord reigns, the Lord is at the right hand of the Father, the Lord has looked at me and sent me and has given me his grace and has made me a child of the Father”. This is what “Christian joy” really is.

A Christian, therefore, “lives in joy”. But, Francis asked, “where is this joy in the saddest moments, in times of anguish? Let’s think about Jesus on the Cross: did He have joy? Eh, no! But yes, He had peace!”. Indeed, the Pope explained, “Joy, in the moment of anguish, of trial, becomes peace”….

“A Christian without joy isn’t Christian; a Christian who lives continuously in sadness is not a Christian”. A “Christian who loses peace in trying times, in times of illness, of so many difficulties, is missing something”.

Francis urged: “do not have fear” but instead “have joy”. He explained that “not having fear is asking for the grace of courage, the courage of the Holy Spirit; and having joy is asking for the gift of the Holy Spirit, even in the most difficult times, through that peace that the Lord gives us”.

— Pope Francis in a homily on fear and on joy on the 15th of May 2015 as reported by L’Osservatore Romano and published on the Vatican website (note: for a slightly different English translation of some of this see Ann Schneible’s news report as published by the Catholic News Agency: For example,
“A Christian without joy is not Christian. A Christian who continually lives in sadness is not Christian. And a Christian who, in the moment of trial, of illness, of so many difficulties, loses peace – something is lacking in him.”)

“Jesus Christ, rising from the dead, has made man’s life one long festival of joy.”

— Saint Athanasius, 297373 AD, as quoted by Pope John XXIII, “Good Pope John,” in his 1924 diary entry in his autobiography ‘Journal of a Soul’, 1980 revised edition published by Geoffrey Chapman, page 215

The following points are all taken from Pope Paul VI’s May 1975 Apostolic Exhortation entitled “On Christian Joy“. They are listed in the order they appear.

  1. All the more does man know spiritual joy or happiness when his spirit enters into possession of God.
  2. Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. For joy comes from another source. It is spiritual. Money, comfort, hygiene and material security are often not lacking; and yet boredom, depression and sadness unhappily remain the lot of many. These feelings sometimes go as far as anguish and despair.
  3. There is also needed a patient effort to teach people, or teach them once more, how to savor in a simple way the many human joys that the Creator places in our path: the elating joy of existence and of life; the joy of chaste and sanctified love; the peaceful joy of nature and silence; the sometimes austere joy of work well done; the joy and satisfaction of duty performed; the transparent joy of purity, service and sharing; the demanding joy of sacrifice.
  4. It is therefore by becoming more present to God, by turning away from sin, that man can truly enter into spiritual joy.
  5. In essence, Christian joy is the spiritual sharing in the unfathomable joy, both divine and human, which is in the heart of Jesus Christ glorified. (Section II)
  6. In His humanity He had experienced our joys. He has manifestly known, appreciated, and celebrated a whole range of human joys, those simple daily joys within the reach of everyone. The depth of His interior life did not blunt His concrete attitude or His sensitivity. He admires the birds of heaven, the lilies of the field. He immediately grasps God’s attitude towards creation at the dawn of history. He willingly extols the joy of the sower and the harvester, the joy of the man who finds a hidden treasure, the joy of the shepherd who recovers his sheep or of the woman who finds her lost coin, the joy of those invited to the feast, the joy of a marriage celebration, the joy of the father who embraces his son returning from a prodigal life, and the joy of the woman who has just brought her child into the world. For Jesus, these joys are real because for Him they are the signs of the spiritual joys of the kingdom of God (Section III)
  7. For the Christian as for Jesus, it is a question of living, in thanksgiving to the Father, the human joys, that the Creator gives him.
  8. Iit is necessary…to understand properly the secret of the unfathomable joy which dwells in Jesus and which is special to Him…. If Jesus radiates such peace, such assurance, such happiness, such availability, it is by reason of the inexpressible love by which He knows that He is loved by His Father.
  9. The Fathers of the East abound in testimonies about this joy in the Holy Spirit. Origen, for example, often describes the joy of the one who has intimate knowledge of Jesus: “His soul is then inundated with joy, like that of the old Simeon. In the temple which is the Church he embraces Jesus in his arms….” …. In the West, it is sufficient to cite the names of some of those who have taught the way to holiness and joy: St. Augustine, St. Bernard, St. Dominic, St. Ignatius Loyola, St. John of the Cross, St. Teresa of Avila, St. Francis de Sales and St. John Bosco.
  10. Joy is the result of a human-divine communion, and aspires to a communion ever more universal. In no way can it encourage the person who enjoys it to have an attitude of preoccupation with self. Joy gives the heart a catholic openness to the world of people, at the same time that it wounds the heart with a longing for eternal bliss.
  11. The joy of divine Truth… This is the joy which is offered to you. It gives itself to those who love it enough to seek it tenaciously.
  12. The fundamental and simple reasons for joy? God has so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son; through His Spirit, God’s presence does not cease to enfold us with His tenderness and to fill us with His life (in the Conclusion)
  13. It is this same Spirit who still today gives to so many Christians the joy of living day by day their particular vocation, in the peace and hope which surpass setbacks and sufferings.
  14. Joy cannot be dissociated from sharing. In God Himself, all is joy because all is giving.
  15. The need for baptized Christians to be faithful to the Sunday celebration, in joy, of the Eucharist. How could they neglect this encounter, this banquet which Christ prepares for us in His love? Let participation in this celebration be at the same time very dignified and festive! It is the crucified and glorious Christ who passes among His disciples to bring them together into the renewal of His resurrection.

— Pope Paul VI’ in his May 1975 Apostolic Exhortation entitled “On Christian Joy

Final Quote…

“Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say: Rejoice” (Phil 4:4)

— St Paul

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