b) Jesus’ Teachings

Jesus teaching from boat to crowdJesus’ Teachings: Top Quotes

  1. “I am the way and the truth and the life.(Jesus)
  2. “You call me Master and Lord, and rightly, so I am.” (Jesus)
  3. “Jesus tells us that the purpose of our freedom is to say yes to God’s plan for our lives.” (Pope John-Paul II)
  4. “Jesus teaches us that we are accountable to God, that we must follow our consciences, but that our consciences must be formed according to God’s plan for our lives.” (Pope John-Paul II)
  5. “‘‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’” (Jesus)
  6. “His teaching is simple,
    contained in what he called
    the new commandment:
    ‘Love one another as I have loved you.'” (Jean Vanier)
  7. “Jesus declared that entry into the Kingdom of God was NOT through observance of the Law. For Jesus there was only one gate by which we could enter into the Kingdom of God—and that gate was COMPASSION.” (Fr Peter McVerry)
  8. “The Gospel is CERTAINLY DEMANDING. We know that Christ never permitted his disciples and those who listened to him to entertain any illusions about this.” (Pope John-Paul II)
  9. “It is a narrow gate and a hard road that leads to life, and only a few find it.” (Jesus)
  10. “Shower those you love with affection and flowers while they are still alive.” (Fr Ron Rolheiser)
  11. “When Jesus found someone whose dignity was being undermined as a human being, a child of God, … he responded in three ways:
    1. He affirmed their dignity by the way in which he himself related to them.
    2. He challenged the attitudes of society.
    3. As the opposition from the religious authorities grew, he did not pull back or change his mind but continued, even to death, to stand up for and accompany those who were despised.” (Fr Peter McVerry)
  12. “Christ commanded his followers to perform what Christians have come to call the Works of Mercy: feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, clothing the naked, sheltering the harborless, visiting the sick and the prisoner, and burying the dead. Surely a simple program for direct action, and one enjoined on all of us…. help given from the heart at a personal sacrifice.” (Dorothy Day)
  13. “Christ said, ‘Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.'” (Dorothy Day)
  14. “The ‘Our Father’ aims to form our being, to train us in the inner attitude of Jesus.” (Pope Benedict XVI)

Full Quotes, and Source of Quotes: Jesus’ Teachings

“I am the way and the truth and the life.

— Jesus (John 14:6)

“You call me Master and Lord, and rightly, so I am.”

— Jesus (John 13:13)

“Jesus tells us that the purpose of our freedom is to say yes to God’s plan for our lives. What makes our ‘yes’ so important is that we say it freely; we are able to say ‘no.’ Jesus teaches us that we are accountable to God, that we must follow our consciences, but that our consciences must be formed according to God’s plan for our lives. In all our relationships to other people and to the world, Jesus teaches us what we must do, how we must live in order not to be deceived, in order to walk in truth. And today, dear young people, I proclaim to you again Jesus Christ: the way, and the truth and the life – your way, your truth and your life.

What is in accord with the truth of Jesus is fulfilment, joy and peace, even if it means effort and discipline. What is not in accord with his truth means disorder, and when done deliberately it means sin. Deliberate or not, it eventually means unhappiness and frustration. ”

— Pope John Paul II (meeting with youth, New Orleans, 1987)

“Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?”
Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.”

— Jesus, in Matthew 22:36-40

“His teaching is simple,
contained in what he called
the new commandment:
‘Love one another as I have loved you.’
Love your enemies.
Love those who hate and persecute you.
Love those who have become outcast
and those who are excluded from the group
because they are ‘useless’, non-productive:
the blind, the lame, the sick,
the poor and the lepers.
Love not just those of your own tribe,
your own class, family or people,
but those who are different,
those who are strangers,
who are strange to your ways,
who come from different cultural and religious traditions,
who seem odd,
those you do not understand.
Love as the Samaritan loved the man he found
beaten up by the robbers,
somewhere on the road between Jerusalem and Jericho.

To love is to open our hearts to people
to listen to them,
to appreciate them,
and see in them their own unique value,
to wish deeply that they may live and grow.
To love is to give our lives for one another.
It is to forgive,
and to be compassionate.

…. Jesus teaches us how to live
giving us the charter of the beatitudes.”

— Jean Vanier, founder of the L’Arche communities, in his 1988 book ‘The Broken Body‘, pages 36-38

“Christ teaches us that the best use of freedom is charity, which takes concrete form in self-giving and in service.”

— Pope John Paul II (in his 1979 and first encyclical Redemptor Hominis [section 21], which is Latin for ‘The Redeemer of Man’)

“Jesus said two things about the Kingdom of God that were new and radical:

  1. Jesus declared that entry into the Kingdom of God was NOT through observance of the Law. For Jesus there was only one gate by which we could enter into the Kingdom of God—and that gate was COMPASSION.
  2. He warned us that ignoring the suffering of those around us would exclude us from the Kingdom of God.”

— Fr Peter McVerry, SJ, page 27 of his book ‘Jesus: Social Revolutionary?‘, Veritas Publications, Dublin, 2008

“The Gospel is CERTAINLY DEMANDING. We know that Christ never permitted his disciples and those who listened to him to entertain any illusions about this…. At the same time, however, he reveals that HIS DEMANDS NEVER EXCEED MAN’S ABILITIES. If man accepts these demands with an attitude of faith, he will also find in the grace that God never fails to give him the necessary strength to meet those demands.”

— Pope John Paul II (in his book ‘Crossing the Threshold of Hope’)

“Enter by the narrow gate, since the road that leads to perdition is wide and spacious, and many take it; but it is a narrow gate and a hard road that leads to life, and only a few find it.”

— Jesus (in Matthew 7: 13-14)

“The anointing of Jesus’ feet in the weeks just before his death (Jn 12:1-8)… Jesus’ challenge here is for us to anoint each other while we are still alive: Shower those you love with affection and flowers while they are still alive, not at their funerals.”

— Fr Ron Rolheiser

“We must learn from Jesus not to complain, not to get angry, and not to lose our tempers with anyone, and not to nurse in our hearts any dislike for those we believe have injured us, but to have compassion for one another, because we all have our faults, some of one kind, some of another, and we must love everyone.”

— Pope John XXIII, “Good Pope John,” in a 1901 letter from Rome to his “beloved parents, brothers, sisters, grandfather, and uncle” as published in his autobiography ‘Journal of a Soul’ revised edition 1980 by Geoffrey Chapman of London & NY, page 354

“Jesus exclaimed: ‘I bless you, Father, Lord of heaven and of earth, for hiding these things from the learned and the clever and revealing them to mere children.'”

— Jesus (Matthew 11:25 or here)

“The Gospel message is good news to the poor: “Be human, not God.” This poverty, revolting as it is to our nature, is blessed when it is accepted because it opens us to God and makes us realise our need for a Saviour. Aware that we can never find fulfilment in ourselves, we are drawn to look to him alone. It is to little ones, those who accept to be thus poor, that the secrets of God are revealed.”

— Sister Ruth Burrows, O.C.D. (a Carmelite nun at Quidenham in Norfolk, England; an author of a number of best-selling books; as published on page 257 of the July 2012 Magnificat booklet)

“One way of summing up the whole revelation of Jesus is to say that, as God is the parent of us all, every human being has the same dignity of being a child of God, no matter who we are or what we may have done. When Jesus found someone whose dignity was being undermined as a human being, a child of God, … he responded in three ways:

  1. He affirmed their dignity by the way in which he himself related to them.
  2. He challenged the attitudes of society.
  3. As the opposition from the religious authorities grew, he did not pull back or change his mind but continued, even to death, to stand up for and accompany those who were despised.

…. Affirming the dignity of travellers, homeless people, drug users and offenders is often a challenge to the conventional thinking of a society.”

— Fr Peter McVerry, SJ, pages 19, 20, 22, 24 of his book ‘Jesus: Social Revolutionary?’, Veritas Publications, Dublin, 2008

“What Jesus has to say is not in code, is not specialist, is for all…. The truths of life are simple. Jesus didn’t come to confuse—that’s the satanic power—but to clarify.”

— Fr Paschal Scanlon, Vincentian, St. Peter’s, Phibsboro, Dublin

“Christ commanded his followers to perform what Christians have come to call the Works of Mercy: feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, clothing the naked, sheltering the harborless, visiting the sick and the prisoner, and burying the dead. Surely a simple program for direct action, and one enjoined on all of us. Not just for impersonal ‘poverty programs’, government-funded agencies, but help given from the heart at a personal sacrifice.”

— Dorothy Day in the book ‘Dorothy Day: Selected Writings‘; Orbis Books, New York; 2005 edition; edited by Robert Ellsberg; page 315, in the section ‘Politics and Principles’

“It is my burning desire that, during this Jubilee, the Christian people may reflect on the corporal and spiritual works of mercy. It will be a way to reawaken our conscience, too often grown dull in the face of poverty. And let us enter more deeply into the heart of the Gospel where the poor have a special experience of God’s mercy.

Jesus introduces us to these works of mercy in his preaching so that we can know whether or not we are living as his disciples.

Let us rediscover these corporal works of mercy: to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, clothe the naked, welcome the stranger, heal the sick, visit the imprisoned, and bury the dead.

And let us not forget the spiritual works of mercy: to counsel the doubtful, instruct the ignorant, admonish sinners, comfort the afflicted, forgive offences, bear patiently those who do us ill, and pray for the living and the dead.”

— Pope Francis, as quoted in the May 2015 Monthly Message by the World Union of Catholic Women’s Associations

“Christ told Peter to put aside his nets and follow him. He told the rich young man to sell what he had and give to the poor and follow him. He said that those who lost their lives for his sake should find them. He told his followers that if anyone begged for their coats to give up their cloaks, too. He spoke of feeding the poor, sheltering the homeless, of visiting those in prison and the sick, and also of instructing the ignorant. He said, ‘Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.'”

— Dorothy Day in the book ‘Dorothy Day: Selected Writings’; Orbis Books, New York; 2005 edition; edited by Robert Ellsberg; page 69; July-August 1935

“And studying the New Testament, and its commentators, I have come in this my seventy-sixth year, to think of a few holy words of Jesus as the greatest comfort in my life.
‘Judge not.”Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.’
‘Forgive seventy times seven times.’
All words of our Lord and Saviour. I ‘have knowledge of salvation through forgiveness of my sins,’ as Zacharias sang in his canticle.”

— Dorothy Day in the book ‘Dorothy Day: Selected Writings’; Orbis Books, New York; 2005 edition; edited by Robert Ellsberg; page 348; December 1972

“To us at The Catholic Worker, anarchism means ‘Love God and do as you will.’ ‘For such, there is no law.’ ‘If anyone asks for your cloak, give him your coat too.’ One could go on with these scriptural teachings of Jesus.”

— Dorothy Day in the book ‘Dorothy Day: Selected Writings’; Orbis Books, New York; 2005 edition; edited by Robert Ellsberg; page 357; July-August 1977

“The ‘Our Father’ aims to form our being, to train us in the inner attitude of Jesus.”

—Pope Benedict XVI in his first book as Pope: ‘Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration’, 2007, page 132 and chapter five (‘The Lord’s Prayer’) of the London: Bloomsbury Publishing edition

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