d) Saints

saints male femaleTop Quotes AT-A-GLANCE: Saints

(See Further Down The Page For The Full Quotes)

  1. “It is we ourselves that we have to think about, no one else. That is the way the saints worked.” (Dorothy Day)
  2. “We need to have the courage to place our deepest hopes in God alone.” (Pope Benedict XVI)
  3. “Saints make you feel good about yourself, not guilty! They bring out the best in us.” (Fr Donal Neary)
  4. “To be a saint is to be fuelled by gratitude, nothing more and nothing less.” (Fr Ron Rolheiser)
  5. “A saint is one who always choose the better of two courses open to him at every step.” (Robert H Benson)
  6. “One cannot possibly understand the teaching of the saints unless one has a pure mind and is trying to imitate their life.” (Saint Athanasius)
  7. “The Church doesn’t make saints. What the Church will do is recognize that these two great Popes, John Paul II and John XXIII, lived a saintly life.” (Msgr. Walter Insero)
  8. “Let us not forget that it is the saints who give direction and growth to the Church.” (Pope Francis)
  9. “What we really need are people who are inwardly seized by Christianity, who experience it as joy and hope, who have thus become lovers. And these we call saints.” (Pope Benedict XVI)

Saints

“It is we ourselves that we have to think about, no one else. That is the way the saints worked. They paid attention to what they were doing, and if others were attracted to them by their enterprise, why, well and good. But they looked to themselves first of all.”

—Dorothy Day, referenced as “‘House of Hospitality‘ p. 74″ on page 20 in the Introduction to her book ‘On Pilgrimage’, the 1999 edition by T&T Clark, Edinburgh, which is partly online here

“When I invite you to become saints, I’m asking you not to be content with second best… Having money is not enough to make us happy;… Being highly skilled will not make us happy; One of the great tragedies of this world is that so many people never find happiness, because they look for it in the wrong places. True happiness is to be found in God. We need to have the courage to place our deepest hopes in God alone…. Once you enter into a friendship with God, everything in your life begins to change. As you come to know him better, you find you want to reflect something of his infinite goodness in your own life…. And once these things begin to matter to you, you are well on your way to becoming saints.”

—Pope Benedict XVI in his talk to kids, 17 September 2010, as part of his visit to the UK

“Really holy people seem to be cheerful, and we feel cheerful with them. They are constantly in love. Holiness that makes the rest of us feel guilty is not really holiness. Saints make you feel good about yourself, not guilty! They bring out the best in us.
We need holy people!… We cannot live the Christian life only by prayer–we are called to love. This is the vocation of everyone, and in the end of life we will be judged on love. The biggest saints were those who loved God and others passionately.”

—Fr Donal Neary, SJ (front of a Logos Publications misselette on The Feast of All Saints, 2011)

“To be a saint is to be fuelled by gratitude, nothing more and nothing less…. Only one kind of person transforms the world spiritually, someone with a grateful heart…. Gustavo Gutiérrez, the father of liberation theology, suggests that, to have a healthy spirituality, we must feed our souls in three ways: ‘through prayer, both private and communal; through the practice of justice; and through having those things in our lives (good friendships, wine-drinking, creativity, and healthy leisure) that help keep the soul mellow and grateful.’”

—Fr Ron Rolheiser

“It is said that a saint is one who always choose the better of two courses open to him at every step.”

—Robert H Benson

“Saints are people who do not take no for an answer when they are challenged by great obstacles.”

—’The Word’ section of the (Irish) Redemptorists’ ‘Sunday Message’ Mass leaflet, 3rd October, 2010

“The saints are the true interpreters of Holy Scripture. The meaning of a given passage of the Bible becomes most intelligible in those human beings who have been totally transfixed by it and have lived it out.”

—Pope Benedict XVI in his first book as Pope: ‘Jesus of Nazareth: From the Baptism in the Jordan to the Transfiguration’, 2007, in Chapter 4 ‘The Sermon on the Mount’, page 78 of the Bloomsbury Publising, London edition

“There are saints in the Roman Curia, among the cardinals, priests, religious, sisters, and laity. They work hard, and also do things that are often hidden. I know some who concern themselves with feeding the poor or who give up their free time to work in a parish. As always, the ones who aren’t saints make the most noise … a single tree falling makes a sound, but a whole forest growing doesn’t.”

Pope Francis I, at his first press-conference, on the plane flying back from World Youth Day in Brazil, July 2013 (as quoted in the Irish Catholic newspaper, 1st August, 2013)

“St Stephen has the glory of having been the first of a countless line of men and women who have laid down their lives willingly for Jesus. But the day after, 27th December, we celebrate the one apostle who was not a martyr. It was not that St John was not as eager and willing as the other eleven. But all attempts to martyr him mysteriously failed.”

— Sr Wendy Beckett, in her book ‘The Art of Christmas’, page 23, Redemptorist Publications, Hampshire, England, 2008 (ISBN 978-0-85231-354-1)

“One cannot possibly understand the teaching of the saints unless one has a pure mind and is trying to imitate their life…. A person wishing to see a city or country goes to the place in order to do so. Similarly, anyone who wishes to understand the mind of the sacred writers must first cleanse his own life, and approach the saints by copying their deeds.”

— St Athanasius, 296-373 AD, as quoted on catholic.org under the section called ‘Quotes from St Athanasius’ with the reference “in his conclusion to The Incarnation of the Word, Chapter 9, (9:57)”

“The Church doesn’t make saints. What the Church will do is recognize that these two great Popes, John Paul II and John XXIII, lived a saintly life.”

— Msgr. Walter Insero, Communications Director, Vicariate of Rome, as quoted in a RomeReports.com news report, 31st March 2014 “Find out how the Vatican is getting ready for the canonization of John Paul II and John “

“Saint John XXIII and Saint John Paul II saw Jesus in every person who suffers and struggles. These were two men of courage…. They were priests, and bishops and popes of the twentieth century. They lived through the tragic events of that century, but they were not overwhelmed by them. For them, God was more powerful; faith was more powerful – faith in Jesus Christ the Redeemer of man and the Lord of history; the mercy of God, shown by those five wounds, was more powerful; and more powerful too was the closeness of Mary our Mother.

In these two men, who looked upon the wounds of Christ and bore witness to his mercy, there dwelt a living hope and an indescribable and glorious joy (1 Pet 1:3,8). The hope and the joy which the risen Christ bestows on his disciples, the hope and the joy which nothing and no one can take from them. The hope and joy of Easter, forged in the crucible of self-denial, self-emptying, utter identification with sinners, even to the point of disgust at the bitterness of that chalice. Such were the hope and the joy which these two holy popes had received as a gift from the risen Lord and which they in turn bestowed in abundance upon the People of God, meriting our eternal gratitude….

John XXIII and John Paul II cooperated with the Holy Spirit in renewing and updating the Church… Let us not forget that it is the saints who give direction and growth to the Church. In convening the Council, Saint John XXIII showed an exquisite openness to the Holy Spirit. He let himself be led and he was for the Church a pastor, a servant-leader, guided by the Holy Spirit. This was his great service to the Church; for this reason I like to think of him as the the pope of openness to the Holy Spirit.

In his own service to the People of God, Saint John Paul II was the pope of the family. He himself once said that he wanted to be remembered as the pope of the family. I am particularly happy to point this out as we are in the process of journeying with families towards the Synod on the family. It is surely a journey which, from his place in heaven, he guides and sustains.”

— Pope Francis in his homily during the Mass for the canonisation of Popes John XXIII and John-Paul II 27th April, 2014 (homily as recorded on the Vatican website)

“What we really need are people who are inwardly seized by Christianity, who experience it as joy and hope, who have thus become lovers. And these we call saints.”

— Pope Benedict XVI in his book ‘Salt of the Earth’ (interviewed by Peter Seewald)

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